Frequently Asked Questions About Vasilissa Honey

 

 

01

Does honey have an expiration date?
 

Honey stored in sealed containers can remain stable for decades and even centuries! However, honey is susceptible to physical and chemical changes during storage; it tends to darken and lose its aroma and flavor or crystallize. These are temperature-dependent processes, making the shelf life of honey difficult to define. For practical purposes, a shelf life of two years is often stated. Properly processed, packaged and stored honey retains its quality for a long time. If in doubt, throw it out, and purchase a new jar of honey!

02

What is the crystallization of honey?

 

Crystallization is the natural process by which the glucose in honey precipitates out of the liquid honey. Different varieties of honey will crystallize at different rates, and a few not at all. It does not affect the quality or the valuable honey ingredients. If your honey crystallizes, simply place the honey jar in warm water and stir until the crystals dissolve. Be careful not to boil or scorch the honey. Also keep in mind that you can eat the honey in a crystallized form. Just scoop out of the jar and spread it on your toast or drop it in your tea!

03
What does it mean to use ecological beekeeping practices?

 

Ecological beekeeping practices apply to the fact that the beekeeper will not transfer his hives in organized fields where pesticides are used. Therefore the danger of bees coming in contact with residues of pesticides, miticides, antibiotics, organophosphates, and other chemicals is prevented.

It also means that the beekeeper himself will not use any chemicals in order to prevent or deal with any bees’ disease.

04

Is all honey the same?

 

No, there are many varieties and flavors of honey, depending on the flowers from which bees collect nectar.

05
Should individuals with diabetes eat honey?

 

Honey is the sweetener of choice for diabetics.  Honey actually stabilizes blood sugar and lowers HbA1c levels, something refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) cannot do.  After ingestion, honey is converted directly into liver glycogen and does not result in formation of triglycerides (fatty acids) as typically occurs after the consumption of large amounts of HFCS and sucrose.  Honey does not trigger an immediate or excessive insulin release such as results from the consumption of most artificial sweeteners, and thus does not promote fat production, fat storage, and weight gain commonly associated with the use of these products.

06
Why are honey bees important to agriculture?

 

Think of your breakfast, lunch or dinner today. Did you know approximately 30 percent of all of the wonderful foods we have at our finger tips are brought to us by the relationship among beekeepers, honey bees and farmers?

07

How do you prevent your bees from starving during the winter months?

 

We leave 100 pounds or more of capped honey in the hive for honeybees to feed on over the cold months of winter and into early spring.

08

What is honey exactly?

Honey is a complex mix of:

(80%) natural sugars

(18%) water

(2%) minerals, vitamins, pollen and protein

 

Of honey's 80% natural sugar content, around 70% is made up of fructose and glucose. The balance of these two sugars determines whether a honey is clear or set. Both types are equally pure and additive free.

09

What is the role of pollen in honey?

 

Honey is the sweetener of choice for diabetics.  Honey actually stabilizes blood sugar and lowers HbA1c levels, something refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) cannot do.  After ingestion, honey is converted directly into liver glycogen and does not result in formation of triglycerides (fatty acids) as typically occurs after the consumption of large amounts of HFCS and sucrose.  Honey does not trigger an immediate or excessive insulin release such as results from the consumption of most artificial sweeteners, and thus does not promote fat production, fat storage, and weight gain commonly associated with the use of these products.Honey is made by honey bees from the nectar of flowers and plants, not pollen. Pollen is actually an accidental guest in honey, brought back by the bee as a source of food for baby bees (the “brood”), or incidentally introduced into the honey through other means, such as during the extraction process. Pollen in honey is sometimes analyzed to help determine the primary floral source. The amount of pollen in honey is minuscule and not enough to impact the nutrient value of honey. Honey is still honey, even without pollen.